Prevention of Alzheimer’s

Prevention of Alzheimer’s

There’s so much in the news these days calling attention to the fact that diabetes is associated with a profoundly increased risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease. In fact, just watch my recent interview with Dr. Melissa Schilling on the subject.

But there’s an important point that is absolutely critical to understand. While it seems like a good idea for diabetic patients to take medication to control blood sugar, the research seems to indicate that diabetics taking these drugs do not improve their situation, in terms of lowering their risk for Alzheimer’s.

To be clear, I am not saying that diabetics shouldn’t take their blood sugar medications. But I am saying that this looks like this one very important issue, your risk of developing Alzheimer’s, is not improved by medications designed to help normalize blood sugar. Continue reading

Ken L.

The most amazing thing about Ken’s story is that he managed this without any expensive pills or medication. It was all diet and lifestyle changes! – Dr. Perlmutter

At age 62, I was diagnosed with severe type 2 diabetes. I was told I would always be a diabetic and would need to be on medication for the rest of my life. At the time, my fasting blood glucose was 220 and I weighed 185 lbs. (I am 5’11”).

After researching lifestyle options, I embarked on a high healthy fat/low-carb diet with supplementation of Vitamins D and K2, and gut improvements with probiotics and homemade fermented vegetables. Today, at 64, my fasting blood sugar is 72 and I weigh 159 lbs. That’s nearly 30 lbs. lost! I am probably in the best shape I’ve managed in the past 30 years. This was achieved with absolutely no medication whatsoever, and I couldn’t be happier.

-Ken L.

Worrisome Diabetes Advice from Reader’s Digest

Worrisome Diabetes Advice from Reader’s Digest

Dear Reader’s Digest:

I recently reviewed some content on your website that identified The Best and Worst Drinks for Diabetics, and your recommendations were such that I feel compelled to author this response.

In this discussion, which is actually supportive of artificially sweetened beverages your page indicates:

… the American Diabetes Association still suggests that diet soda is a better alternative to a sugar-packed version for people watching their blood sugar. How much: If you already have a soda habit, it’s probably OK to sip one a day instead of a sugary version.

This unfortunate recommendation will likely endanger many diabetics and countless non-diabetics. Continue reading

Alzheimer’s News – This Should Be Front Page!

Alzheimer’s News – This Should Be Front Page!

It’s a staggering statistic, but we are told that by the year 2050 as many as 16 million Americans will be living with Alzheimer’s disease. Projected costs, mostly dedicated to nursing homes and homecare, are estimated to exceed $1.1 trillion.

Research dedicated to Alzheimer’s disease is laser-focused on finding a cure. Unfortunately, our most well-respected institutions are coming up empty-handed despite the incredible dedication of monetary resources in this area.

With these ideas in mind, it is unfortunate, if not heart-wrenching, to consider the simple fact that there is a profound relationship between Alzheimer’s disease and diabetes. Continue reading

High Fructose Corn Syrup and the Brain

High Fructose Corn Syrup and the Brain

Excessive alcohol use can cause fat accumulation in the liver. Ultimately, This accumulation of fat may lead to liver failure that may actually prove fatal.

But it turns out, that there is another form of fat accumulation in the liver that has nothing to do with consumption of alcohol, hence the name non-alcoholic liver disease (NAFDL). NAFDL is considered the most common liver disorder in developed countries, estimated to be present in an incredible 30% of American adults.

NAFDL is often not a benign condition. It is strongly related to insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. That means that people who have NAFDL are far more likely to develop things like type II diabetes and ultimately may even develop cirrhosis of the liver.

Continue reading

My Top 3 Health Recommendations for 2016

My Top 3 Health Recommendations for 2016

As you’re planning your New Year’s Resolutions, consider my list of suggestions for 2016:

  • Exercise – Yes, you’ve heard it so many times before, but our understanding of what exercise does to enhance health is undergoing a revolution. While its been recognized for decades that aerobic exercise in particular is associated with risk reduction for various inflammatory and degenerative conditions, including type 2 diabetes, depression, high blood pressure, coronary heart disease, arthritis, osteoporosis, fibromyalgia, chronic back pain and even low libido, the breakthrough has been the discovery that aerobic exercise actually changes the expression of our DNA! These changes in gene expression turn on pathways that increase our body’s production of antioxidants while reducing inflammatory mediators and amping up detoxification pathways. Yes, it’s easier to take a pill or even a nutritional supplement, but the science supporting what and how exercise does its magic is really compelling. So moving forward, I’d like you to consider 20 minutes of aerobics, every day. Continue reading
Antibiotics and Risk for Diabetes

Antibiotics and Risk for Diabetes

If you’ve been following the microbiome story you are likely aware of the emerging literature that squarely places gut bacteria in a pivotal position as it relates to any number of physiological processes. From regulating the balance of the immune system to determining the level of inflammation that a person may experience, it is now becoming mainstream knowledge that our gut bacteria are poised to regulate our most critical, life-supportive processes.

In Brain Maker, and certainly on this blog, I have written extensively on the important role of the microbiome in terms of regulating blood sugar and insulin sensitivity. As such, we would expect that environmental events that disrupt the gut ecology might have a causative role, or at least show correlation with type 2 diabetes.

Recall that several months ago I called attention to the interesting study from Israeli researchers in which changes to the gut bacteria brought on by exposure to artificial sweeteners were dramatically associated with increased risk for issues related to glucose regulation, insulin sensitivity, and, therefore, type II diabetes.

Continue reading