Category: Exercise

In this section you will find posts related to exercise and the brain. Whether you are interested in preventing dementia or a healthy pregnancy, exercise is one of the most impactful brain boosters out there. Aerobic exercise has been proven to improve memory and preserve brain health.

Some posts to get you started:
Exercise Your Brain
The Process of Neuroplasticity

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Exercise and Mental Health

By Dr. Austin Perlmutter

It’s not news to anyone: exercise is good for our health. What is more interesting is the recent research showing how physical activity may activate certain pathways within our immune systems, our endocrine systems, and even change our brain function. One fascinating area where all of this intersects is the link between exercise and mental health.

Mental health issues are a growing problem in the United States and worldwide. Depression alone affects around 350 million people and is one of the leading causes of disability across the planet. Despite the best efforts of providers and scientists, strategies for treating and preventing depression have been lacking. Many people continue to struggle with the condition even after receiving therapy. This is why it is so important that we continue to look for additional strategies in depression prevention and management. Of these, exercise is among the most promising. Continue reading

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Reducing Risk for Diabetes with Exercise

While there has been so much attention as of late focused on infectious diseases, there is another epidemic that may have even wider implications—type 2 diabetes. In and of itself, diabetes is a significant life-threatening condition. In addition, it is strongly associated with other important and potentially life-threatening diseases like Alzheimer’s, stroke, kidney disease, coronary artery disease, and even cancer.

According to CDC data from 2018, some 34.2 million Americans, or 10.5% of our population, have diabetes. The percentage of adults with this diagnosis increased with age, affecting more than 25% of those aged 65 years or older. And clearly, the data indicates that these numbers are progressively worsening with time. Continue reading

The Empowering Neurologist – David Perlmutter, MD, and Aaron Alexander

The Empowering Neurologist – David Perlmutter, MD, and Aaron Alexander

Yes, what we eat, how well we sleep, and so many other lifestyle choices are really important for our overall health and disease resistance. But how we move, stand, sit and engage our world turns out to be an important health variable as well.

Today we will speak with Aaron Alexander, author of the new book, The Align MethodAaron, founder of Align Method™, is an accomplished manual therapist and movement coach with over 16 years of professional experience, whose clients range from A-list Hollywood celebrities to professional athletes and everyone in-between. Over the last five years, Aaron has interviewed over 300 of the world’s preeminent thought leaders on physical and psychological well-being on the top-rated Align Podcast, bringing together a variety of diverse perspectives on physical inhabitance. He’s a contributor to major media outlets ranging from Entrepreneur Magazine to MindBodyGreen and can typically be found somewhere in the Pacific Ocean or on Original Muscle Beach in Santa Monica, California.

The Align MethodAaron’s first book, was just released and we are going to learn all about it today. He’s got a great podcast as well. Keep up with Aaron on Instagram.

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Alzheimer’s and Exercise – You Can Protect Your Brain

The number of Americans diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease has continued to grow at a dramatic rate. Currently, it is estimated that some 5.8 million Americans (of all ages) have Alzheimer’s disease. By and large, this is a disease of elderly individuals, with approximately 5.6 million of those diagnosed age 65 or older. To put that number into context, consider that this means 1 in 10 people age 65 or older suffers from Alzheimer’s disease. Further, it is instructive to note that there are some 200,000 individuals here in America under age 65 years who have also been given the diagnosis.

Despite heroic research efforts, Alzheimer’s remains a disease for which there is no cure or meaningful treatment whatsoever. That said, it is critical that we ask ourselves if there is any evidence that the disease could be prevented, or at least explore what could be done to lower one’s risk. Continue reading

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Move Your Body – Love Your Brain

How does simply moving around affect the brain? For the past several years I’ve been doing my best to get out the information that shows how aerobic exercise benefits the brain by increasing the growth of new brain cells, as well as reducing the risk for brain degeneration. However, it looks like most adults are not achieving the 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity/week recommended by the 2018 US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Physical Activity Guidelines. In fact, this level of physical activity is only achieved by 57% of adults aged 40-49, and a paltry 26% of those aged 60-69.

That said, researchers recently set about exploring whether simply moving around would have a beneficial impact on brain health. They designed a study of 2,354 participants (with an average age of 53) that ran for three years. The subjects wore an accelerometer that basically determined both the number of steps they took each day as well as the intensity level of their activity. Continue reading

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Dementia – Reducing Your Risk Starts Today

Despite countless hundreds of millions of dollars dedicated to seeking out a meaningful treatment for Alzheimer’s disease, as of the time of this writing the pharmaceutical promise of dealing with this epidemic remains unfulfilled.

So, if there is no meaningful treatment, it would seem sensible to focus on how Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia could be prevented in the first place.

Continue reading

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Exercising to Improve Gut Health

Exercise is a healthy choice no matter how you choose to look at it. Research demonstrating the importance of exercise for cardiovascular health dates back at least four decades. Even more recent research shows how important exercise is for not only brain function, but even in terms of reducing dementia risk.

The importance of gut health, and specifically healthy gut bacteria, has really taken center stage in terms of it’s wide ranging effects on overall health and disease resistance. Relevant to today’s blog post, we are now seeing research that adds gut health to the list of benefits associated with physical exercise. Continue reading