Category: Parkinson’s Disease

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ADHD Drugs Associated with a Dramatic Increased Risk for Parkinson’s

Estimates indicate that approximately 11% of school-aged children in United States have attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Further, approximately 2/3 of these children are currently being medicated for this diagnosis. The most common medications are essentially stimulants like amphetamines or methylphenidates, including drugs like Adderall and Ritalin.

The areas of the brain that are potentially damaged or disrupted by these medications include the basal ganglia, brain structures that are involved in coordinated movement. The other area that is potentially involved is the cerebellum, which also plays a role in movement. Continue reading

The Empowering Neurologist – David Perlmutter, MD, and Dr. Matthew Phillips

The Empowering Neurologist – David Perlmutter, MD, and Dr. Matthew Phillips

While there certainly are various medications that prove somewhat helpful in the treatment of symptoms associated with Parkinson’s disease, it’s important to recognize that these medications are not actually treating the underlying disease itself.

We now understand that one of the pivotal mechanisms in Parkinson’s disease is the compromise of energy production at the mitochondrial level. This ultimately manifests as various problems, not just in the brain but throughout the entire body. With this understanding, specifically targeting mitochondrial function makes sense as a way of addressing this fundamental and underlying abnormality in Parkinson’s. Continue reading

The Empowering Neurologist – David Perlmutter, MD and Dr. George Tetz

The Empowering Neurologist – David Perlmutter, MD and Dr. George Tetz

Without a doubt, we spend a lot of time in this forum discussing the influence of bacteria on the health of the gut, and how that translates into risk for disease elsewhere in the body. As it turns out, there are a multitude of other entities residing within the gut that are absolutely worthy of our attention.

Bacteriophages are a type of virus that can infect bacteria and alter their function. First identified in 1917, bacteriophages have been long overlooked in terms of their potential contribution to human disease.

Our interview today is with Dr. George Tetz, one of the world leaders in bacteriophage research. He has identified pathways whereby bacteriophages can alter gut bacteria in such a way so as to modify their function in the human body. His work relates bacteriophage activity with autoimmune conditions, like Type 1 diabetes. He has also found strong connections between bacteriophages and Parkinson’s disease, a subject into which he’ll dive deeper in our discussion. He believes that these bacteria-infecting viruses may also play a prominent role in other neurodegenerative conditions, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and even Alzheimer’s disease.

The implications of the science shared in this interview are many! I will state at the outset that some of the discussion is at a level that might be challenging for the non-researcher to understand, but there are some terrific takeaways and I would urge all of you to celebrate with me the accomplishments of this incredible scientist.

Finally, I mention a YouTube video that graphically illustrates the function of these bacteriophages. It’s very well-done, and worth a look.

5 Benefits of a Ketogenic Diet – Weight Loss & Beyond

By: The Dr. Perlmutter Team

The ketogenic diet has taken health circles by storm. Everyone seems to know somebody who has “gone keto” or is at least thinking about it. Keto labels are popping up on restaurant menus and in grocery stores.

And yet, the 2018 U.S. News & World Report recently evaluated 40 diets and guess which diet came in dead last? The ketogenic diet.

What is going on here? How can a diet land in two polar opposite camps? In a world that seems to thrive on polarizing controversy, let’s put a few misconceptions to rest and take a look into the effects of the ketogenic diet on the body. Because there is no doubt about it – the benefits of a ketogenic diet are profound. Continue reading

Ketosis & Parkinson’s Disease: Improving Symptoms with a Ketogenic Diet

Ketosis & Parkinson’s Disease: Improving Symptoms with a Ketogenic Diet

If you feel like you are hearing about more and more about Parkinson’s Disease in the media lately, you shouldn’t be surprised. Cases are being presented with more and more frequency, such that Parkinson’s rate of incidence is now somewhere between 2% and 4% of the population over 60 in the US.

Of course, Parkinson’s is impacted by man factors, such as genetics and environment, but at its core Parkinson’s is an energy issue, characterized by the failure of mitochondrial activity in cells, the location where cellular energy is produced. This paves the way for the subject of today’s discussion, and how a ketogenic diet may lead to symptomatic improvement in Parkinson’s patients. Let’s take a look at the latest science, presented in the journal Neurology.

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Gut Inflammation Affects the Brain

The fundamental mechanism that underlies such seemingly disparate issues as autism, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, and various other neurodegenerative conditions, is the process of inflammation. As you will note, this has been a central theme in my recent lectures, television programs, as well as books, as this is what current science is strongly supporting.

But it now looks as if this process, inflammation, may actually begin in the gut and subsequently affect the brain as a downstream mechanism. In a submission to the Journal of Neuroinflammation, researchers at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles reported on a fascinating experiment.

Using a laboratory mouse, they administered a chemical, dextran sodium sulfate (DSS), into the drinking water of some of the animals. They then examined the brains of these animals at various times up to 26 days after the chemical was placed in the water. DSS specifically causes gut inflammation. Continue reading

Why Lifestyle Choices Matter for Health

Why Lifestyle Choices Matter for Health

What my work, in Brain Maker and Grain Brain, boils down to, is giving you a lifestyle plan that you can follow to cause optimal health. Why do these factors matter? Why are these the choices you should make? Simple: because this is the best way to fight and reduce inflammation, the cornerstone player in diseases like Parkinson’s, diabetes, Alzheimer’s, and even cancer.