Category: Science

Here you will find posts related to the most groundbreaking science that is available to us as it pertains to gluten intolerance and brain health. We all have the gift of brain plasticity, meaning that if we apply the conclusions of these studies to our daily lives we can actually grow new brain cells!

Some posts to get you started:
The Process of Neuroplasticity
Increasing Gluten Sensitivity?

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Worsening Fires — More Than Just Climate Change

This past summer, Leize and I spent a lot of time in British Columbia. In fact, if you are following my live videos on Facebook, you might recall several entries that called attention to the massive fires that were raging through both the B.C mainland and Vancouver Island. While fires in the Northwest are not uncommon, this year’s events were unprecedented in terms of their scope and duration.

As I pondered the reasons for what we were observing, I naturally defaulted to the idea that, front and center, this was yet another manifestation of climate change. But just this morning I learned that there is another sinister player that appears to be be playing a major role in increasing the frequency and intensity of these wildfires.

Continue reading

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The E-Cigarette Explosion in American Youth—And Why It Matters

By: Austin Perlmutter, M.D.

Electronic cigarettes (commonly known as e-cigarettes) are a relatively new phenomenon. They’ve been discussed by some as a safer alternative to regular cigarettes, and have seen massive spikes in popularity over the last several years. Like many new technologies, it’s taken a bit of time for research to catch up with marketing. Unfortunately, this window has allowed for an incredible surge in e-cigarette use within one of our most vulnerable populations.

In November of 2018, the CDC released a report on e-cigarette use in American youth. The results show an epidemic, with 1 in 5 high school students and 1 in 20 middle school students using these products this year. These shocking statistics show that e-cigarette users increased from 1.5% of high school students in 2011 to 20.8% in 2018. Even more shocking, the total number of high schoolers using e-cigarettes increased by 78% from 2017 to 2018. Continue reading

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Alzheimer’s Drugs Worsen Cognitive Function

It’s becoming quite common these days to see news releases documenting the failure of yet another experimental drug for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. In fact, one major pharmaceutical company, Pfizer, indicated in February of this year that they were no longer going to pursue efforts to develop a drug to treat this disease, which is now reaching epidemic proportions.

That said, millions of Americans are already taking medication that is FDA approved, to “treat” their Alzheimer’s disease. Since these medications are FDA approved, one would expect that they’ve been extensively tested and proven not only safe, but effective as well. Continue reading

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Yes – Alzheimer’s Can be Reversed!

I’ve often been quoted as stating that there is no pharmaceutical approach that has meaningful effectiveness on the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. Unfortunately, I have to continue to make this claim. As was recently reported in the journal Neurology:

Despite great scientific efforts to find treatments for Alzheimer’s disease (AD), only 5 medications are marketed, with limited beneficial effects on symptoms, on a limited proportion of patients, without modification of disease course. The prevalence of AD doubles every 5 years reaching an alarming rate of 50% in those aged 85 years and older. In the context of the demographic trends of modern society, where the elderly are the fastest growing segment of the population, identification of new therapeutic targets that may prevent, delay, or cure AD is critically needed. (italics added).

The authors reemphasize what we know: that there is no silver bullet available now, or in the foreseeable future, that will help with this devastating and fatal condition. Continue reading

The Insulin Sweet Spot: Is Lower Better?

The Insulin Sweet Spot: Is Lower Better?

We commonly think that if something is good for our health, that more of it is even better, right? More kale never hurt anyone. Putting on extra sunscreen may not protect us from even more UV rays, but it certainly won’t cause excess damage!

But is that actually always true? How about with insulin, which we’re commonly told to keep as low as possible? Continue reading

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You Can Reduce Your Risk for Parkinson’s Disease!

As we have explored previously, elevated blood sugar is clearly toxic for the brain. Higher blood sugar is clearly a risk for Alzheimer’s disease, along with coronary artery disease, diabetes, and even cancer.

But focusing on the brain, I think it’s important to emphasize that elevated blood sugar has wide-ranging negative effects on brain cells and their functionality. Elevated blood sugar is associated with inflammation, and this is a cornerstone mechanism across a wide spectrum of neurodegenerative conditions, including Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. In addition, persistent elevation of blood sugar ultimately compromises the function of the hormone insulin. We now recognize that insulin is important for the health and integrity of the brain not only because of its role in allowing glucose to be used as fuel, but also how it functions as a nurturing hormone. Continue reading

The Therapeutic Value of Plants

The Therapeutic Value of Plants

Perhaps you’ve noticed, more and more, that the number of plants people are keeping in their home is multiplying. Certainly there’s an aesthetic reason for this, but what if it was impacting our health as well? A recent study in HortScience looked at the impact of plants in hospital recovery rooms to see if the presence of plants impacted the health of these patients, measuring factors like levels of pain and duration of hospitalization.

Let’s investigate what they found.

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New to a Low-Carb Keto Diet? Avoid These Common Mistakes

By: The Dr. Perlmutter Team

The ketogenic diet is one of the most talked about and debated diet trends today. You’ve probably heard celebrities, athletes, and neighbors raving about the benefits of this dietary approach. Interestingly, the science backs up its rapid growth in popularity, as a ketogenic diet has been shown to have numerous health benefits for its adherents. The diet can reduce the risk of heart disease, improve glycemic control in both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, help individuals struggling with obesity lower their BMI, and even improve or control symptoms of debilitating neurodegenerative conditions like Parkinson’s and epilepsy. There is even some evidence to suggest that a ketogenic diet can play a role in the treatment of cancer! If it is implemented properly, adopting a ketogenic diet can be a very powerful tool in the fight against a variety of chronic diseases.

If you’ve recently made the decision to transition to a ketogenic diet or are exploring the possibility of a change, chances are you might currently find yourself in a world of confusion. What is ketosis? What are ketones? Can I really eat all the fatty foods I want? How can this possibly be good for me?

Allow me to address some of these questions. Continue reading