FBPixel Gut microbiota composition reflects disease severity and dysfunctional immune responses in patients with COVID-19 - David Perlmutter M.D.

Science

Study Title
Gut microbiota composition reflects disease severity and dysfunctional immune responses in patients with COVID-19
Publication
Gut
Author(s)

Yun Kit Yeoh, Tao Zuo, Grace Chung-Yan Lui, Fen Zhang, Qin Liu, Amy YL Li, Arthur CK Chung, Chun Pan Cheung, Eugene YK Tso, Kitty SC Fung, Veronica Chan, Lowell Ling, Gavin Joynt, David Shu-Cheong Hui, Kai Ming Chow, Susanna So Shan Ng, Timothy Chun-Man Li, Rita WY Ng, Terry CF Yip, Grace Lai-Hung Wong, Francis KL Chan, Chun Kwok Wong, Paul KS Chan, Siew C Ng

Abstract

Objective: Although COVID-19 is primarily a respiratory illness, there is mounting evidence suggesting that the GI tract is involved in this disease. We investigated whether the gut microbiome is linked to disease severity in patients with COVID-19, and whether perturbations in microbiome composition, if any, resolve with clearance of the SARS-CoV-2 virus.
Methods: In this two-hospital cohort study, we obtained blood, stool and patient records from 100 patients with laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection. Serial stool samples were collected from 27 of the 100 patients up to 30 days after clearance of SARS-CoV-2. Gut microbiome compositions were characterised by shotgun sequencing total DNA extracted from stools. Concentrations of inflammatory cytokines and blood markers were measured from plasma.
Results: Gut microbiome composition was significantly altered in patients with COVID-19 compared with non-COVID-19 individuals irrespective of whether patients had received medication (p < 0.01). Several gut commensals with known immunomodulatory potential such as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, Eubacterium rectale and bifidobacteria were underrepresented in patients and remained low in samples collected up to 30 days after disease resolution. Moreover, this perturbed composition exhibited stratification with disease severity concordant with elevated concentrations of inflammatory cytokines and blood markers such as C reactive protein, lactate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase and gamma-glutamyl transferase.
Conclusion: Associations between gut microbiota composition, levels of cytokines and inflammatory markers in patients with COVID-19 suggest that the gut microbiome is involved in the magnitude of COVID-19 severity possibly via modulating host immune responses. Furthermore, the gut microbiota dysbiosis after disease resolution could contribute to persistent symptoms, highlighting a need to understand how gut microorganisms are involved in inflammation and COVID-19.

Date
January 11, 2021
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Dr. David Perlmutter is on the cutting edge of innovative medicine that looks at all lifestyle influences on health and illness.

Andrew Weil, MD