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Differences Between Grass-Fed, Grass-Finished, and Grain-Fed Beef

By the Dr. Perlmutter Team

As previously discussed, there are significant nutritional differences between the meat produced by cows that eat grass and those that subsist on grain. Beef from cows that eat only grass contains higher concentrations of essential nutrients, omega-3 fatty acids, and conjugated linoleic acid. It also has lower levels of hormones, antibiotics and other toxic remnants from the industrial production process, which can have significant ramifications on our health, ranging from the microbiome to cellular health. Additionally, grass-fed cows live out their lives more closely aligned with how nature intended—freely roaming pasture land and consuming grasses available to them in their immediate environment—which makes the process more humane and environmentally-friendly.

However, like many of the buzzwords surrounding healthy living, there’s a lot of confusion and outright deception that surrounds the “grass-fed” descriptor. While certain trade organizations do their best to impose uniform standards, the use of the term “grass-fed” is, unfortunately, not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration or the United States Department of Agriculture. This sadly leaves the label open to abuse by unscrupulous producers looking to harvest the benefit of the term without putting in the effort to truly raise grass-fed cattle. The process of getting the “grass-fed” label approved on packaging for a given farm’s beef is incredibly lax, and actually doesn’t even include a farm inspection! Essentially, the government takes farms at their word when determining whether or not their product should be labeled grass-fed. Continue reading

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Grain-Fed vs Grass-Fed and Finished Beef – Why Does it Matter?

By the Dr. Perlmutter Team

Americans eat a lot of meat. In 2018, the United States Department of Agriculture projected that the average person would consume over two hundred pounds of chicken, pork, and beef by year’s end. That’s more than half a pound daily per capita, every day of the year! While it is possible to consume an omnivorous diet and maintain a healthy lifestyle, we recommend viewing meat as a garnish or side dish rather than the focus of your meal. The perfect plate is full of colorful, above-ground leafy vegetables and healthy fats, and if you choose to eat meat, then a three-to-four ounce serving of meat. However, it’s very important to remember that not all meat is created equally.

One of the most important factors in determining the overall quality of meat—especially red meat—is the dietary patterns of the livestock that produced it. When you think about it, this makes perfect sense: the food an animal consumes is used by their body to grow and develop, and, ultimately, becomes the very food that we consume. Feeding cattle a nutrient-poor diet will, in turn, produce a nutrient-poor food source, compared to cattle fed a natural, nutritious diet.

As it turns out, the age-old adage “You are what you eat” applies to cattle, too! Continue reading

Dr. Perlmutter and Danielle

Danielle

It’s great to hear about the success that Danielle, a patient of mine, has had, and I look forward to hearing about the results from her upcoming race. – Dr. Perlmutter

I am a 44 year old woman who has Multiple Sclerosis.  I am also a lifelong endurance athlete, having competed in events ranging from ultra marathons to Ironman triathlons. There is no question in my mind that the high-fat, low carb diet that Dr. Perlmutter has placed me on has improved my health tremendously.

For as long as I can remember, I have suffered from stomach aches and wrapping pain around my midsection. I endured years of emergency room and gastroenterology visits/tests before receiving a diagnosis of MS. My doctor at that time encouraged me to take the disease-modifying medications, but I was repelled by the side effects of these meds and began to research alternative therapies. A friend suggested that I see Dr. Perlmutter and I will forever be thankful for that recommendation.
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Anti-Alzheimer's Trio: Avocado, Grass-fed Beef, Avocados

The Anti-Alzheimer’s Trio

During an appearance on the Dr. Oz show two ago, I was asked to highlight what I would consider to be the three items we should all be working into our diets more frequently to help support better brain health. Not knowing how popular it would later become, I outlined my “Anti-Alzheimer’s Trio,”  three foods high in “brain-healthy” fat including:

  • Grass-fed beef
  • Avocados
  • Coconut Oil

These items are all low in carbs and high in fat, helping to reduce some of that brain-bullying inflammation the root cause of so many ailments. Specifically, coconut oil is known as a rich source of beta-HBA, is one of our brain’s “superfuels.”

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