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Reflecting on CBS This Morning

Wow! Yesterday, the release of Grain Brain Revised, was an incredibly exciting day. From visiting with the folks at MindBodyGreen to taking your questions live in numerous live chats on Facebook and Instagram, I was privileged to get to spend the day speaking with you all and spreading our message on optimal health.

But it goes without saying that the most provocative part of my day was how it started — my conversation with CBS This Morning. Let me start by saying it was an honor to get to sit with such a storied team of reporters. It was humbling to have Gayle, John, and the entire team present for this dialogue.

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Blood Sugar and Your Brain

Several years ago, when I wrote Grain Brain, I had a long discussion with our publisher centered around choosing the best subtitle. Ultimately, we decided to emphasize the toxic role of sugar and carbs on the brain, and with good reason. Since that time, there have been a large number of studies that have confirmed the thesis that elevated blood sugar is profoundly detrimental, not just for the brain in general, but for brain function as well.

As the authors of a new paper entitled, Brain atrophy in ageing: Estimating effects of blood glucose levels vs. other type 2 diabetes effects point out, our brains shrink as we age with as much as 5% volume loss occurring between age 60 and 70. And as you would expect, this correlates with declining function.

A lot of the research has shown that type 2 diabetes (T2D) is what accelerates brain aging. But as this new study shows, it’s not the diagnosis of T2D that is the issue. Well before that diagnosis is made, brain structure is affected by blood sugar, even in the “normal” range! Continue reading

Diet Drinks Threaten the Brain

The message that we should all dramatically reduce our sugar consumption is really gaining traction and for good reason. This was a central theme of Grain Brain, and these ideas have certainly been validated since I published that book back in 2013.

Unfortunately, as people have learned about the threats of sugar consumption, soft drink manufacturers have decided to emphasize sugar-free beverages, sweetened with artificial sweeteners, as a “healthy” alternative. To be clear, nothing is further from the truth.

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The Empowering Neurologist – David Perlmutter, MD and Gary Taubes

Gary Taubes’ new book, The Case Against Sugar, is a riveting deep-dive into the history, politics, perverted science, and subterfuge that have had supporting roles in making sugar so pervasive. Really, who better to write this book than Gary Taubes?!

From Amazon.com:

Gary Taubes is an investigative science and health journalist and co-founder of the non-profit Nutrition Science Initiative (NuSI.org). He is the author of Why We Get Fat and What to Do About It and Good Calories, Bad Calories (The Diet Delusion in the UK). Taubes is the recipient of a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Investigator Award in Health Policy Research, and has won numerous other awards for his journalism. These include the International Health Reporting Award from the Pan American Health Organization and the National Association of Science Writers Science in Society Journalism Award, which he won in 1996, 1999 and 2001. (He is the first print journalist to win this award three times.) Taubes graduated from Harvard College in 1977 with an S.B. degree in applied physics, and received an M.S. degree in engineering from Stanford University (1978) and in journalism from Columbia University (1981).

These are impressive accolades for sure, but what’s most impressive about Gary is his life’s dedication to helping change our views on sugar, which clearly represents a clear and present danger to global health, coupled with his incredible skill in communicating this information.

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How “Sugar-Free” Spells Danger

Diet books, as a category, are among the most popular titles sold in bookstores, and with good reason. With soaring rates of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and other chronic conditions, and an overall lack of any meaningful “medical” fixes for these issues, consumers are desperately seeking out other venues that may provide answers and actionable information to combat these common maladies.

But whether a nutritionally-themed book is focused on blood type, targeting gene expression, lengthening telomeres, or even going gluten-free, one central theme that has emerged with widespread commonality is the importance of reducing sugar.

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The “Right” Kind of Sugar

Whether it’s questions about organic maple syrup, or honey from organic bees, there’s a big push to understand the “right” kind of sugar in the diet.

Just know this: at the end of the day, sugar is sugar. Organic or otherwise, sugar in the diet is still going to have harmful impacts on the body.

Andy M.

About 5 years ago I moved to Australia from England. I was about average weight, but you could probably say I was “skinny-fat” at the time (not much muscle). After a year of living in a new country and eating a lot of carbohydrates, junk food and sugars my weight ballooned to 185 lbs. (I’m 5′ 7″). I tried to lose the weight through cardiovascular exercise and low-fat diets, but this just made things worse, I was always hungry and just gained more weight. When I couldn’t stomach the diet anymore, I returned to my usual eating habits, and with it came excess weight gain.

In 2013 I was looking through the Internet for another solution and stumbled across ketogenic diets. I read lots of studies and participated in the forums online, and finally adopted this lifestyle. Continue reading

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Prevention of Alzheimer’s

There’s so much in the news these days calling attention to the fact that diabetes is associated with a profoundly increased risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease. In fact, just watch my recent interview with Dr. Melissa Schilling on the subject.

But there’s an important point that is absolutely critical to understand. While it seems like a good idea for diabetic patients to take medication to control blood sugar, the research seems to indicate that diabetics taking these drugs do not improve their situation, in terms of lowering their risk for Alzheimer’s.

To be clear, I am not saying that diabetics shouldn’t take their blood sugar medications. But I am saying that this looks like this one very important issue, your risk of developing Alzheimer’s, is not improved by medications designed to help normalize blood sugar. Continue reading