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The Empowering Neurologist – David Perlmutter, MD, and Dr. Will Cole


When Grain Brain first hit shelves, one of the first questions I started to hear repeated to me again and again was “This is great and all, but what can I do if I’m a vegetarian?” The answer is simple: you can be a vegetarian and follow the Grain Brain lifestyle, no problem (and if you want to learn more about this, visit our vegan/vegetarian focus page).

Now as similar lifestyles begin to take the spotlight, the ketogenic lifestyle chief among them, the same question, posed about these diets, are coming to the fore. Thankfully, Dr. Will Cole is here to help. Continue reading

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Sources of Protein for Vegetarians

I’m often asked how someone who chooses to be vegetarian, or vegan, can get enough protein in their diet.

While that’s an important question, I want to start my answer by pointing out that choosing this lifestyle can put you at risk for mineral deficiencies and vitamin deficiencies (like B12 and D). While these are not destined to happen, they are risks, and ones you must control for.

Now, when it comes to protein, think about nuts and seeds. Legumes and soy tend to not end up on my list of best choices, and I’ll explain why.

Kale – What You Probably Didn’t Know

As many of you will note, I have blogged quite a few times about the health virtues of kale. This is truly one on the healthiest food choices you can bring to your table.

Kale, a member of the cabbage family, is power packed with vitamins A, K, C, with meaningful amounts of B vitamins as well as trace minerals. It’s low in carbs and calories.

But there another attribute that I think is important to share in our discussion of kale. Like broccoli, Brussels sprouts, bok choy and cauliflower, kale is a cruciferous vegetable. That means that the flowers of these vegetables take the form of a cross. More importantly, it means that like other cruciferous vegetables, kale is rich in a chemical called sulforaphane, and this may be one of kale’s most important health attributes.

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Brain Maker for Vegetarians and Vegans

Brain Maker, as well as Grain Brain, places a focus on healthy fat consumption, which sometimes can be difficult for vegans and vegetarians. Frequently, questions come in about how to adapt this type of lifestyle for people who follow a vegan/vegetarian diet. The good news? It’s easy to customize the recommendations of Brain Maker to be vegan or vegetarian-friendly, and, even better, some of the most important foods in Brain Maker are already such!

Optimal Diet for Brain Health

It started with Grain Brain, but it is increasingly clear that a high-fat, high-fiber, low-carb diet is a scientifically validated and viable nutrition plain for not just brain health, but for total health. A diet with this makeup is one that fosters positive health in the gut, creating a microbial balance that sets the stage for a reduced risk for disease like Type 2 Diabetes. What does that diet look like in execution? Find out in today’s video.

 

4 Reasons Why Kale is a True Superfood

By: Austin Perlmutter, MD, Medical Student, Miller School of Medicine

When it comes to healthy vegetables, kale may be among the best. Packing a powerful punch of antioxidants, nutrients and excellent digestive support, its role in optimal wellness is tough to dispute. For anyone still undecided, here are the top 4 reasons to make kale a part of your life.

  1. Kale is jam-packed with vitamins. Eating one cup of chopped kale gets you over 200% of your daily value of vitamin A, 134% of your daily value for vitamin C, and almost 700% of your daily value for vitamin K! In addition, kale contains important minerals like manganese, potassium and copper.  Continue reading